Reviews for Dear Brigitte ( ) 720p

IMDB: 6.3 / 10

A fun quirky comedy

I remember seeing this in the movie theater when I was a boy; I'm the same age as Bill Mumy and was always interested in his shows.

Like many movies it's important to understand the times in which the movie was produced. This was the age when the computer was moving from a science fiction tool to a daily part of life. Many of the themes in the movie were things that people were wrestling with every day. A decent father trying his best to raise his children right but trapped in his own perceptions of life. A daughter grown up in a completely different age. A young boy who is a mathematical savant in a family of liberal arts specialists. The mother doing her best to uphold the respect her family and children deserve. All held together in a very off beat setting.

All of this makes for a unique comedy that to me has grown with age. No, it's not a knee-slapper. But there are interesting themes being played out that grow as you watch. The ending of a child's innocence. The brutal march of technology. The desire to hold on to traditions deemed vital. And in the final scenes, the knowledge that with all our desire to control the future, luck and pure chance will have it's say.

And Brigitte Bardot's part is.....how do I say it......wonderful? She comes across as interesting and genuine. I think it's a great role.

Don't expect pie-in-the-face-fun. If you can't wrap yourself around the show and the times it's understandable. It's quirky and offbeat and wasn't pre-shown to theaters so they could write the script, the script was written and shot and there it is. But if you have it a chance (or two) you'll be pleasantly surprised.

A fun family comedy

I've always have had a soft spot for family comedies, when they are charming, witty, and engaging, and this fits the bill. Its a harmless, lovely entertainment. Jimmy Stewart is is good, warm mode as a father who finds that his son (an endearing Bill Mumy) is a math genius who can solve the hardest of equations in just seconds and also has the knack for figuring out horse races as well. True he's also colorblind and tonedeaf, but not even geniuses can have everything. Glynis Johns has a bit of a smaller part as Stewart's wife but she is as welcome as ever and knows exactly how to play a scene.

The film receives its name from all the lett ers the boy sends to Brigitte Bardot, upon whom he has a case of a very youthful crush. Ms. Bardot actually appears toward the end, and her cameo is one of the high points of the film. This film might not be appreciated by cynics, nor by those wanting the height of sophistication, but as an example of cinematic comfort food, it is utterly enchanting.

Stewart at His Worst, Poor Movie, Good Performance by Mumy

Jimmy Stewart has lost what made him famous. Here he is an old man without charm, without sparkle. Any light that shines through is from the boy, Billy Mumy, as he is too young to understand Stewart's rule for the other cast members: do not outshine me! Thus, we see an almost invisible Fabian, and other cast members that can't be remembered.

Also, eight year old boys do not have sexual crushes on sexpots like Brigitte Bardot. Hollywood always makes this mistake -- thinking it looks cute. Eight year old boys are catching frogs with other eight year old boys. They do not have sexual crushes until they reach the developmental stage of puberty.

A poor movie and Jimmy Stewart at his worst. Stewart's 1930's heydays are over and no one has told him.

Very little going for this one

Half a star for Jimmy Stewart at age 57 (though clearly too old to be a father of an 8-year-old), half a star for Glynis Johns at age 42 (she's perky and kinda fun), and half a star for a few shots of San Francisco at the beginning. There's not much else going for this one, folks. The script is awful. The use of the narrator (Ed Wynn) is awful. The boy who is a savant at math and who therefore can pick horse races is ridiculous. Yes it's a family film and meant to be light, but they can be so much better. It seems Director Henry Koster or the studio had a real dog on their hands, and tried desperately to liven it up with a next-door-neighbor artist who has his wife pose in the nude, and the inclusion of Brigitte Bardot. Bardot's scenes are late in the movie, brief, and a snooze – so don't hang on to watching this for them (as I did). Bail early.

Very little going for this one

Half a star for Jimmy Stewart at age 57 (though clearly too old to be a father of an 8-year-old), half a star for Glynis Johns at age 42 (she's perky and kinda fun), and half a star for a few shots of San Francisco at the beginning. There's not much else going for this one, folks. The script is awful. The use of the narrator (Ed Wynn) is awful. The boy who is a savant at math and who therefore can pick horse races is ridiculous. Yes it's a family film and meant to be light, but they can be so much better. It seems Director Henry Koster or the studio had a real dog on their hands, and tried desperately to liven it up with a next-door-neighbor artist who has his wife pose in the nude, and the inclusion of Brigitte Bardot. Bardot's scenes are late in the movie, brief, and a snooze – so don't hang on to watching this for them (as I did). Bail early.
Okay, I acknowledge that I am prejudiced.

While primarily a right-brain person myself, the so-called whimsy of aNoCal "Pulitzer-Prize winning poet" (?), who lives on an ugly, decrepitdocked river boat, in discovering that his artistically talentless sonhappens to be a mathematical prodigy, is lost in a the growlingmisanthropy of star James Stewart's dithering, hostile performance.

The marvelous Billy Mumy, always a charismatic child actor, plays thegifted young Erasmus, and Glynnis Johns shines as the patient mother.The problem? Stewart and Stewart's charmless, utterly selfish father.His original instinct being to hide his child's gifts is bad enough,but I switched the movie off in disgust when he revealed he did notknow (and had no clue) of his elder child (a daughter's) age (she's 18,and he didn't know). Add to that his threatening reporters with aloaded shotgun, plus his ranted lectures about "progress" as being theprovenance of what he calls "the Exploders" and you have a rancidfamily comedy that has aged abominably.

My guess: Stewart, a notably ungenerous actor who demanded that theshow center all around him, may have been annoyed by the effortlessscene stealing from the sly, charming, profoundly gifted young Mumy,who made everything look easy and fun. Stewart is upstaged in everyscene by Mumy, and it's my (completely unfounded) guess that he wasunhappy about it. But what do I know? I only have his neurotic,overwrought, and badly miscalculated work to go on.

Fabian has nothing to do. Guessing also Stewart may have had somethingto do with this. But again, who knows? Stewart famously was enragedafter the release of the wonderful "Winchester 73" that the young RockHudson, in his few scenes, stole Stewart's thunder: Stewart neverworked with him again.

By the time Ms. Bardot shows up, Stewart has had his conversion, butalas, all the same, all is lost. Not a half-shell on Stewart's otherHenry Koster- directed comedy, "Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation", which isstill charming, if oh-so-Sixties, family fun (benefiting as it doeswith a Mancini score, Maureen O'Hara, and a touch more Fabian, plusbetter color and production values).

Note: Love narrator Ed Wynn's expository asides to the camera(audience), with the other characters often asking him,Pirandello-like, just who he is talking to?

Overall verdict: block out Stewart (which is hard to do), and theothers are just fine. I too often like Stewart, so if you're a fan, doyourself a favor and let this botch go by.

Forgettable Time Passer

Contrived family comedy with a good cast. Jimmy Stewart plays Professor Leaf, who hates science and loves the arts. Professor Leaf is alarmed to discover his young son Erasmus (Billy Mumy) is a math prodigy. It becomes headline news and turns their family's life upside down, leading to a deal with a con man and some gambling and other stuff. Anyway, the main point of the film, as evidenced by the title, is that the boy is in love with the actress Brigitte Bardot. He writes her a letter and eventually heads to Paris with his father to meet her. It's all very blah and forgettable, but not necessarily bad. Stewart gives it his best but it's just mediocre material. Good cast does little to help. Mumy is good, as is Glynis Johns as the wife. Brigitte Bardot appears briefly as herself. If you're a die-hard Stewart or Bardot fan, check it out. Otherwise it's not worth the bother. I dug Jimmy's blue station wagon though!

Fussy, annoying family comedy; ersatz Disney without the car chase...

John Haase's novel "Erasmus With Freckles" gets a woebegone Hollywood makeover and, while it may look promising at the outset, it turns out to be one of the weakest films James Stewart ever starred in. Young Billy Mumy, a mathematical genius, spends all of his spare time writing juvenile love letters to French film actress Brigitte Bardot (though it isn't mentioned just how many of her pictures he has actually been allowed to see). Eventually, dad Stewart gets Mumy an audience with the siren (whose brief appearance is the only bright spot here). Movies about unconventional family broods have to include more than just hectic, noisy silliness to keep our attention; this adaptation doesn't even try for a sense of eccentricity in the content of character, nor does it expand on the central child's personality. It's meant to be heart-warming, non-threatening fun, yet it borders dangerously on bland, with nary a single funny scene. *1/2 from ****
Read the book, "Erasmus With Freckles," and see how it compares to themovie, "Dear Brigitte." While I enjoy anything with James Stewart andhave been a Bill Mumy fan for most of my life, I can honestly say thisis one time when the book shines better than the film. I have noproblem with the performances in the movie, mark you ... I merely don'tlike it when screenwriters take a good book and make a movie out of itthat is very little like the original. The family is bigger andsomewhat goofier ... and the boat (and the Leaf's neighbors) play amuch larger role. I couldn't find Ed Wynn's character anywhere in thenovel. Seems a shame to ruin such a good novel by turning it into thismovie -- the movie's fine, it's just not the story originally told.

a strange yet bland film

In the 1960s, Jimmy Stewart did several family films that were just rather bland and, in my opinion, wasted his amazing talents. I am not saying they are BAD films, just imminently forgettable and are best described as "fluff". In other words, while time-passers, they have very little lasting value. The movie does have a few mildly interesting moments but that's really about all. In fact, the only reason the film even gets a score of 6 is because Stewart is in the film and he tries his best with the mediocre material. My recommendation is do NOT run out and rent it or buy it but wait until it comes out on cable. This is a far cry from THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE or MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON. It's more like an episode of GIDGET combined with PLEASE DON'T EAT THE DAISIES.

This is pretty much the same review I gave for MR. HOBBES TAKES A VACATION. Both were almost exactly as bland as the other. What sets this apart is the strange plot involving a young Billy Mumy as a genius who is smitten with the actress Brigitte Bardot (the kid had good taste). Ms. Bardot makes a cameo near the end of the film, but apart from that it's a pretty forgettable film.
In the 1960s, Jimmy Stewart did several family films that were justrather bland and, in my opinion, wasted his amazing talents. I am notsaying they are BAD films, just imminently forgettable and are bestdescribed as "fluff". In other words, while time-passers, they havevery little lasting value. The movie does have a few mildly interestingmoments but that's really about all. In fact, the only reason the filmeven gets a score of 6 is because Stewart is in the film and he trieshis best with the mediocre material. My recommendation is do NOT runout and rent it or buy it but wait until it comes out on cable. This isa far cry from THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE or MR. SMITH GOES TOWASHINGTON. It's more like an episode of GIDGET combined with PLEASEDON'T EAT THE DAISIES.

This is pretty much the same review I gave for MR. HOBBES TAKES AVACATION. Both were almost exactly as bland as the other. What setsthis apart is the strange plot involving a young Billy Mumy as a geniuswho is smitten with the actress Brigitte Bardot (the kid had goodtaste). Ms. Bardot makes a cameo near the end of the film, but apartfrom that it's a pretty forgettable film.
Jimmy Stewart makes it look so effortless that one would think hewasn't even acting. Which is the mark of a great actor. This was hissecond outing with Glynis Johns, the first time was in 1951 in theblack and white British film, No Highway In The Sky.

In Dear Brigette, Stewart plays a Literature Professor at a College inCalifornia that like most of the culture of the day was struggling withthe rampant advances of technology threatening to over shadow everyoneand everything.

The main focus of the film is on child actor Bill Mumy who later wenton to star in Lost In Space. He plays a young boy named "Erasmus", whois a math wizard and who can do complex calculations in his head,seemingly without effort, and not quite knowing how he does it.

While people and forces around him would like to capitalize on hisgift, his father played by Stewart struggles to protect his son fromthem, and allow him to remain a "innocent little boy". A delightfulinterlude takes place half way through the picture when "Erasmus"receives an invitation to visit Paris, France and Brigette Bardot; whomhe has been secrety writing to for some time, hence the pictures title.
I'm sure that the folks who were casting Lost in Space must have seenDear Brigitte and said to themselves, young Billy Mumy would be perfectcasting as the precocious Will Robinson.

Dear Brigitte is a film about a professor of literature who lives on aconverted old Mississippi riverboat with his family and the formercaptain of the steamship, Ed Wynn. An almost hippie like existence forthe very Republican James Stewart and his wife Glynis Johns andchildren Cindy Carol and Billy Mumy.

Stewart has an obsession about the sciences just taking over colleges,including his own and this fuels an additional obsession into finding atalent that must be hidden in his son. Young Mr. Mumy turns out to beboth color blind and tone deaf, so art and music are out.

He turns out to be a mathematical genius though and Billy has anadditional obsession himself, he wants to meet Brigitte Bardot. Nowthat's something the males in the audience can empathize with.

I think Dear Brigitte came out just a tad to early. A couple of yearslater with the flower power movement in full bloom, this thing wouldhave really been big box office. Audiences might have really identifiedwith an eccentric professor with his family living on a riverboat.

Fabian is also along for the ride as daughter Cindy Carol's boyfriend.He was nearing the end of the line as a teenage heart throb. But I'msure his presence in the film brought more than a few dollars in.

John Williams and Jesse White who play a couple of con men do a nicejob and of course we cannot forget the presence of Brigitte Bardotplaying herself.

It's a pleasant innocuous little family comedy helped by a very goodcast.
Fairly good comedy featuring an ultra smart little boy who is used byswindlers for their own gain despite the over protectiveness of hisfather.Meanwhile, the boy is scheming to meet the famous French actress while hissister is anguishing over boys and proms. Typical 60'scomedy.

Slight comedy

In the 1960's this might have passed for wholesome family entertainment. Getting Fabian for a throw-away role was probably a good casting coup, and for comic relief you have Ed Wynn and Billy Mumy's 'Rain Man' routines. He is an IBM in sneakers, from which most of the plot develops. He secretly writes a love letter to Bardot every night and one day he gets a response in the form of an invitation to visit her in France. Billy and dad Jimmy Stewart go to Paris and have a meeting with Miss Bardot. She gives the little boy an autograph, a kiss and a puppy.

Inoffensive little comedy that might give you a laugh or two. I like movies that reference real movie stars in their title, like "Being John Malkovich" and "To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything, Julie Newmar" so this makes the hat trick for me.
I stumbled upon "Dear Brigitte" almost by accident, and the names in thecredits -- Jimmy Stewart, Glynis Johns, Ed Wynn, etc. -- kept me watching.I was pleasantly surprised by how charming and intelligent this filmturnedout to be! Stewart plays an English professor whose only son, Erasmus(theadorable Billy Mumy), turns out to be a math whiz. He's also great atpredicting horses, and he happens to be in love with Brigitte Bardot (whomakes a wonderful cameo appearance). The family lives on a houseboat, andtheir teenaged daughter dates Fabian. All of this makes for a veryenjoyable comedy the whole family can watch together -- it may be a bitoutdated (particularly the "high-tech" computer featured in one scene),butthat only adds to its charm. This is a lovable, often overlooked moviethat's definitely worth viewing with the whole family!