Reviews for Dangerous Game ( ) 720p

IMDB: 5.7 / 10

Attempt at Artsy That Never Makes It!

Madonna has never been an actress. That's really not in question in this movie either. She's a media draw. The movie tries to be dark and artistic. It ends up dark and... Something. The acting is okay but the characters they play are all mixed up in their real-life personas, their characters in the movie and the characters in the film. None of them are done well.

Claustrophobic.

Psychological drama within a drama, centered around a film shoot, where the line between reality and the film's story start to blur.

Lousy movie

I don't like this movie because it is very depressing. And I also don't like it because it's not a happy movie. Plus there is violence and rape in this movie which is very bad. And some of the scenes are too dark to see what's going on.

It is disturbing, it is heavy, it is good... Abel Ferrara at his best!

This one is not your typical Hollywood fare. Emotionally gripping and confronting, "Dangerous Game" cuts to the core of human nature and our search for answers and meaning. Abel Ferrara's exploration of our desires, fears, and failings rings painfully true. Starring Madonna (don't let that put you off) Harvey Keitel and James Russo, and directed by Abel Ferrara, this is an interesting psychological drama about a directors obsession with his film, and the stars breakdown of reality during their making of it. This film is filmed like a documentary about the actors in their film how they get on or not get on you will have to watch it to get the benefit, my description is not fulfilling the content of the film very well.

Madonna and Harvey Keitel are extremely good on their roles, and Madonna is actually able to prove that she can be very good if the role is good enough. She delivers a sincere performance about an actress too embroiled in the characters she plays. Along with the legendary Harvey Keitel, the cast does an amazing job portraying the seedy underbelly of the film industry, using what appears to be old- school method acting. Possibly the best Madonna performance in a movie ever! Such a shame her acting didn't continue along this road. She's actually very credible in this and years later, the movie itself seems much more cohesive than it was upon first viewing.

Overall rating: 8 out of 10.

It is disturbing, it is heavy, it is good... Abel Ferrara at his best!

This one is not your typical Hollywood fare. Emotionally gripping and confronting, "Dangerous Game" cuts to the core of human nature and our search for answers and meaning. Abel Ferrara's exploration of our desires, fears, and failings rings painfully true. Starring Madonna (don't let that put you off) Harvey Keitel and James Russo, and directed by Abel Ferrara, this is an interesting psychological drama about a directors obsession with his film, and the stars breakdown of reality during their making of it. This film is filmed like a documentary about the actors in their film how they get on or not get on you will have to watch it to get the benefit, my description is not fulfilling the content of the film very well.

Madonna and Harvey Keitel are extremely good on their roles, and Madonna is actually able to prove that she can be very good if the role is good enough. She delivers a sincere performance about an actress too embroiled in the characters she plays. Along with the legendary Harvey Keitel, the cast does an amazing job portraying the seedy underbelly of the film industry, using what appears to be old- school method acting. Possibly the best Madonna performance in a movie ever! Such a shame her acting didn't continue along this road. She's actually very credible in this and years later, the movie itself seems much more cohesive than it was upon first viewing.

Overall rating: 8 out of 10.
One of the first movies in a while to really drag me in, possiblythanks to the performances of the leads.

This feels REAL, and it's intense. A movie about the making of a moviewhere the drama is just as solid and visceral off-screen as it is on,but it's not some reality TV rubbish, it's a deeper reflection on lifeand relationships. That is, the movie that's depicted as being filmed,and the movie you're watching.. like layers of Inception.

This movie studies what people need to be whole, whether they'reintrinsic or extrinsic, whether they need others, need drugs, needalcohol, money, god, or can be whole within themselves. The confusionthat lust sows. The conflicts that occur when those needs are at oddsbetween partners. The nature of need. How sometimes when we lovesomeone, they become a part of us, and the separation becomes physical.

Finally a movie that was worth my time.

A drama within a drama reflecting life

One of the first movies in a while to really drag me in, possibly thanks to the performances of the leads.

This feels REAL, and it's intense. A movie about the making of a movie where the drama is just as solid and visceral off-screen as it is on, but it's not some reality TV rubbish, it's a deeper reflection on life and relationships. That is, the movie that's depicted as being filmed, and the movie you're watching.. like layers of Inception.

This movie studies what people need to be whole, whether they're intrinsic or extrinsic, whether they need others, need drugs, need alcohol, money, god, or can be whole within themselves. The confusion that lust sows. The conflicts that occur when those needs are at odds between partners. The nature of need. How sometimes when we love someone, they become a part of us, and the separation becomes physical.

Finally a movie that was worth my time.

Take a Powder

Director Abel Ferrara's "movie-movie" has director Harvey Keitel (as Eddie Israel) filming "Mother of Mirrors" starring Madonna (as Sarah Jennings) and James Russo (as Francis Burns) as a "real life" married couple. Madonna wants to be a real actress, and is finding her religion. Mr. Russo wants to continue a sex 'n' drugs lifestyle. This is an attempt to make a shocking, cutting edge movie with a lot of adult language sprinkled with some violent simulated sex. Madonna looks hot in scenes with a sheer shirt and (later) nada. The characters are neither good nor bad enough to make you care about them in either way, although they TRY.

* Dangerous Game (1993) Abel Ferrara ~ Harvey Keitel, Madonna, James Russo
While shooting a movie in Los Angeles about the abused wife SarahJennings (Madonna) that has converted to Christian and her husbandFrancis Burns (James Russo) that misses their orgies, the New Yorkerdirector Eddie Israel (Harvey Keitel) pushes his lead actor and actressto the edge affecting their real lives. Eddie has one brief affair withSarah but he feels also affected by his work and confesses the truthabout his many infidelities to his wife Mad Israel (Nancy Ferrara),blurring fiction and reality and destroying his marriage.

"Dangerous Game" is a sort of experimental "movie within a movie"showing a parallel journey to hell of the character, lead actor anddirector blended with sex, drugs and booze. The result is a strange andunpleasant movie but very well acted, especially by Madonna that has amagnificent and very convincing performance. It is not entertaining andcertainly not the best film of Abel Ferrara, but for fans like me it isworthwhile watching it. My vote is six.

Title (Brazil): "Olhos de Serpente" ("Eyes of Snake")

Infidelity, Sex, Drugs and Booze

While shooting a movie in Los Angeles about the abused wife Sarah Jennings (Madonna) that has converted to Christian and her husband Francis Burns (James Russo) that misses their orgies, the New Yorker director Eddie Israel (Harvey Keitel) pushes his lead actor and actress to the edge affecting their real lives. Eddie has one brief affair with Sarah but he feels also affected by his work and confesses the truth about his many infidelities to his wife Mad Israel (Nancy Ferrara), blurring fiction and reality and destroying his marriage.

"Dangerous Game" is a sort of experimental "movie within a movie" showing a parallel journey to hell of the character, lead actor and director blended with sex, drugs and booze. The result is a strange and unpleasant movie but very well acted, especially by Madonna that has a magnificent and very convincing performance. It is not entertaining and certainly not the best film of Abel Ferrara, but for fans like me it is worthwhile watching it. My vote is six.

Title (Brazil): "Olhos de Serpente" ("Eyes of Snake")

An interesting film, with many a hidden secrets

Not a particularly entertaining movie this one, but definitely an interesting watch when you take into consideration not only the movie, but the similarities which surrounded its release. And of course Madonna, who (unwittingly?) gives the best performance of her much ridiculed celluloid career.

The film revolves around director Eddie Israel (Keitel) and his supporting cast members in their journey to film the uber-dark relationship drama 'Mother of Mirrors'. Starring alcoholic drug dependent Francis Burns (James Russo) and recent Christian convert Sarah Jennings (Madonna) the film within a film blurs over into real life, leaving the viewer confused about whether the actors are acting their character in 'Mother', their character in 'Dangerous Game' or even their character in real life. The confusion even seems apparent on set, with one directors clapper-board shots with the movies real director A. Ferrara noted on it.

In reality, Ferrara had to resort to accepting finance for the film by Madonna's Maverick Films and thus also accepting its MD as his leading actress. Madonna once said that when she attended the premiere she left the theatre crying as it was in her eyes a completely different movie, and all her best scenes were cut. Dig a little deeper with this one and you might be able to see the underlying story which is far more interesting than what's bubbling on the surface.
As a follow-up to Bad Lieutenant, which could be a possibility fordirector Abel Ferrara's best work to date (or at least most thoughtprovoking), Dangerous Game aims for lower targets while trying for asimilar approach to the dregs of a character's soul. Once again HarveyKeitel is the doomed figure, a man with such a self-destructive impulsethat it'll lead him to nowhere decent. But this time he's not a cop oncompletely the edge of society and self, but a movie director who ismaking a film with such high-intensity, raw emotional drama that itwould make John Cassavetes wince. The main actors in Eddie's movie(Keitel) are Sara (Madonna) and Francis (James Russo) become victim tothat old tune of art imitating life, or vice versa (as the chicken camefrom the egg and back again sort of thing) that starts to make the filmwithin Dangerous Game a very volatile situation. All the while Eddie'sdemands on his actors involve spiritual death via drugs and alcohol andmutual decay towards one another, an abusive relationship where thesexual games have gone sour and all that's left is remorse and contemptdepending on the beat. Soon this seeps out for real, as Francis can'tdistinguish from acting or reality, and a rape scene within the moviebecomes all too real on the set. And, of course, this leads further forEddie's own path of horror.

Unlike Ferrara's previous film, this time Keitel's character doesn'thave that possibility for redemption- in Hollywood, in search of themost brutally honest picture, Eddie Israel won't stop until hepractically gets what he's got bottled up inside right onto screen, nomatter what it does to his actors whom he professes to enjoy and befriendly with (and with Sara more-so). He indulges in drink and moreimportantly women via the movie business, while still keeping upappearances with his wife (Nancy Ferrara) and little boy. So with thislack of Eddie meeting towards any kind of possible sign of hope- andkeep in mind the Herzog clip from Burden of Dreams- it's almost despairfor despair's sake. And watching the scenes being filmed by theactors(The Mother of the Mirrors), though not totally awful, I'mreminded of the old Gene Siskel line about the actors eating lunchbeing more interesting than the movie itself. Still with these flawsnoticed, not to mention a very strange ending that leaves off thecharacter's in some kind of demise either real or filmic (maybe it'sthe point), it's still a good film, or rather a film that defies itsown experimental boundaries to be always fascinating, if only to a filmbuff like myself.

I liked individual scenes very much, like one where Keitel's characterdirects Madonna's Sara into delivering lines to the camera believablyby insulting her as a 'commercial whore', to which she finally giveshim what he wants (it's something that is sometimes mentioned amongdirectors or other actors trying to get believable turns by the otheractor), or in seeing the a very understated scene where Keitel andMadonna do a slow dance out by a pool and he sings a soft tune. I alsoloved the scene involving Keitel and Ferrara (how she's related to thedirector I don't know) when he reveals to her his major transgressionsas she has returned home for her father's funeral (just casting her,too, is wise in showing someone very believable as a person inHollywood's good & normal side). What helps too is the willingness ofthe principle actors to just give it their all, as if they'd kill toget what they're doing right for the director, murky script and all.Truth be told, I found this to be a real high point for Madonna as anactress, not playing some easier part to play like in DesperatelySeeking Susan or League of Their Own, but having to actually tap intoher more decadent side that she loved (at the time) to make as a partof her media image. Russo, too, is good here, if maybe almostdangerously one-note as a man so intense and "method" that he threatensthe whole production.

Finally, there's Keitel, who never ceases to amaze me with what he cando even in moments when the material gives him little to do but to lookoff in a scene with a stare or expression of inner-hell. Actually,that's one of the things he's probably perfected since the 1970s. Hehas moments where he bends his demanding exterior, and there'stenderness to be found within the self-destructiveness in Eddie. Theonly problem then lies with Keitel lacking a means to really channelthis into something leading somewhere- by the end his character doesn'tknow what he'll do with the film, or how to finish it, and this sort ofabrupt ending leaves the actors as well as the film in the cold. But asa film about film-making, I've seen worse, and I might even like itmore if I catch it late one night on cable (definitely *that* kind ofmovie).

it's a difficult and flawed film, but it has some very strong merits in the Ferrara vein

As a follow-up to Bad Lieutenant, which could be a possibility for director Abel Ferrara's best work to date (or at least most thought provoking), Dangerous Game aims for lower targets while trying for a similar approach to the dregs of a character's soul. Once again Harvey Keitel is the doomed figure, a man with such a self-destructive impulse that it'll lead him to nowhere decent. But this time he's not a cop on completely the edge of society and self, but a movie director who is making a film with such high-intensity, raw emotional drama that it would make John Cassavetes wince. The main actors in Eddie's movie (Keitel) are Sara (Madonna) and Francis (James Russo) become victim to that old tune of art imitating life, or vice versa (as the chicken came from the egg and back again sort of thing) that starts to make the film within Dangerous Game a very volatile situation. All the while Eddie's demands on his actors involve spiritual death via drugs and alcohol and mutual decay towards one another, an abusive relationship where the sexual games have gone sour and all that's left is remorse and contempt depending on the beat. Soon this seeps out for real, as Francis can't distinguish from acting or reality, and a rape scene within the movie becomes all too real on the set. And, of course, this leads further for Eddie's own path of horror.

Unlike Ferrara's previous film, this time Keitel's character doesn't have that possibility for redemption- in Hollywood, in search of the most brutally honest picture, Eddie Israel won't stop until he practically gets what he's got bottled up inside right onto screen, no matter what it does to his actors whom he professes to enjoy and be friendly with (and with Sara more-so). He indulges in drink and more importantly women via the movie business, while still keeping up appearances with his wife (Nancy Ferrara) and little boy. So with this lack of Eddie meeting towards any kind of possible sign of hope- and keep in mind the Herzog clip from Burden of Dreams- it's almost despair for despair's sake. And watching the scenes being filmed by the actors(The Mother of the Mirrors), though not totally awful, I'm reminded of the old Gene Siskel line about the actors eating lunch being more interesting than the movie itself. Still with these flaws noticed, not to mention a very strange ending that leaves off the character's in some kind of demise either real or filmic (maybe it's the point), it's still a good film, or rather a film that defies its own experimental boundaries to be always fascinating, if only to a film buff like myself.

I liked individual scenes very much, like one where Keitel's character directs Madonna's Sara into delivering lines to the camera believably by insulting her as a 'commercial whore', to which she finally gives him what he wants (it's something that is sometimes mentioned among directors or other actors trying to get believable turns by the other actor), or in seeing the a very understated scene where Keitel and Madonna do a slow dance out by a pool and he sings a soft tune. I also loved the scene involving Keitel and Ferrara (how she's related to the director I don't know) when he reveals to her his major transgressions as she has returned home for her father's funeral (just casting her, too, is wise in showing someone very believable as a person in Hollywood's good & normal side). What helps too is the willingness of the principle actors to just give it their all, as if they'd kill to get what they're doing right for the director, murky script and all. Truth be told, I found this to be a real high point for Madonna as an actress, not playing some easier part to play like in Desperately Seeking Susan or League of Their Own, but having to actually tap into her more decadent side that she loved (at the time) to make as a part of her media image. Russo, too, is good here, if maybe almost dangerously one-note as a man so intense and "method" that he threatens the whole production.

Finally, there's Keitel, who never ceases to amaze me with what he can do even in moments when the material gives him little to do but to look off in a scene with a stare or expression of inner-hell. Actually, that's one of the things he's probably perfected since the 1970s. He has moments where he bends his demanding exterior, and there's tenderness to be found within the self-destructiveness in Eddie. The only problem then lies with Keitel lacking a means to really channel this into something leading somewhere- by the end his character doesn't know what he'll do with the film, or how to finish it, and this sort of abrupt ending leaves the actors as well as the film in the cold. But as a film about film-making, I've seen worse, and I might even like it more if I catch it late one night on cable (definitely *that* kind of movie).

Repugnant, self-indulgent drama...but Madonna is good

Unappetizing wallow has impassioned movie-director Harvey Keitel guiding an actor and actress through the rigors of filming a psychological drama about an obsessive-compulsive, coke-snorting sadist and his victimized wife. Originally titled "Snake Eyes", this messy picture hopes to tread that surreal line between movie-art and life-imitating-art, but it ain't "The French Lieutenent's Woman". Madonna, whose company Maverick produced the pic, is battered around and continually abused, yet manages to show flickers of focus and credibility as an actress that haven't always been apparent in her star-vehicles. Director Abel Ferrara has obviously managed to gain the trust of his entire cast, but his artifices combined with theirs is a deadly match. The film-within-the-film is nasty and off-putting, with sinewy James Russo taking method acting to an all-new low (which is partly Ferrara's fault, he's not a filmmaker interested in nuances). The movie does indeed go for broke, yet the whole thing is pointlessly broad and loud, and eventually just tiresome. *1/2 from ****
This is a strange and disturbing experimental movie. A rare and greatperformance by Madonna. She actually can act under the control of theright director. Although, I hear she hated. It seems ironic that shefinally makes a good movie and doesn't even realize it. I guess shemade some complaints that she thought her character was going to bestronger. (Funny, if she wants to be a Feminist Avenger, or some kindof role model of strength, maybe she shouldn't have made a career outof exploiting herself for fame and the all mighty dollar. Okay, now I'mranting, but isn't funny how men are especially really down with theNeoFeminist Bull about how it's actually empowering for women toexploit themselves.) Ferrara plays with the autobiographical nature ofthe subject matter. The plot centers on a film director whocompartmentalizes his personal and professional life, until the secretsof his professional life overwhelm him.

Madonna is good, but the movie is bad..

Boring, dark, nasty, and too long but in all this an incredibly good Madonna. The critics asked themselves how she could be so good and were truly worried about it, but fortunately the movie completely failed at the box office. I love Madonna but I admit that I wasn't able to watch this movie.. Iìve tried it twice, but both times after a mid-hour I've stopped it.. It's just too dark, disgusting and cruel and that poor Madonna, bit and humiliated all the time! The example that a good-acting can't make a good movie if the script is weak. Madonna, another time chooses a wrong script, but at least nobody has said that in this movie she can't act!

Madonna is good, but the movie is bad..

Boring, dark, nasty, and too long but in all this an incredibly good Madonna. The critics asked themselves how she could be so good and were truly worried about it, but fortunately the movie completely failed at the box office. I love Madonna but I admit that I wasn't able to watch this movie.. Iìve tried it twice, but both times after a mid-hour I've stopped it.. It's just too dark, disgusting and cruel and that poor Madonna, bit and humiliated all the time! The example that a good-acting can't make a good movie if the script is weak. Madonna, another time chooses a wrong script, but at least nobody has said that in this movie she can't act!