Only the Lonely (1991) 1080p

Movie Poster
Only the Lonely (1991) 1080p web - Movie Poster
Genres:
Comedy | Romance
Resolution:
1920*1040
Size:
1.74G
Quality:
1080p
Frame Rate:
23.976 fps
Language:
English 2.0  
Run Time:
104 min
IMDB Rating:
6.4 / 10 
MPR:
Add Date:

Downloaded:
67
Seeds:
2
Peers:
1
Directors: Chris Columbus [Director] ,


Movie Description:
Danny, a cop, meets and falls in love with Theresa. They get engaged, despite sneaking around behind his mother's back, but when push comes to shove, he can't quite quit worrying about his mother long enough to be any kind of lover to Theresa.

Screenshots

  • Only the Lonely (1991) 1080p web - Movie Scene 1
  • Only the Lonely (1991) 1080p web - Movie Scene 2
  • Only the Lonely (1991) 1080p web - Movie Scene 1

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Reviews

Revisiting this movie and missing John Candy

I recall finding this movie quite enjoyable the first time I saw it years ago, but having picked it up at the library today and rewatched it tonight, it is both underrated for its humorous appeal and ultimate sadness. The primary reason behind both statements was the performance of John Candy.

Admittedly, I was a big fan of "SCTV" when I was in college, and there was a brilliance to the whole cast. But Candy had the rarest of abilities to be both outrageous and still maintain the veneer of believable humanity. Here he's nothing as over the top as Johnny LaRue or Dr. Tongue, and he's allowed more emotional depth than his big-screen credits as Del Griffith (Planes, Trains and Automobiles) and Uncle Buck. He's achingly human and vulnerable, while still funny and lovable. No other performance I ever saw him in makes the case that he could have been a comic-actor treasure better than his Danny Muldoon character in "Only the Lonely." This should have been the movie that made him a true top A-list star. There is heart in this movie performance that is undeniable, along with his gentle humor. He walks the emotional tightrope his character has to negotiate almost perfectly. And then pairing him with a number of other strong casting choices, none more so than an epic return to the screen from Maureen O'Hara as his caustic Irish mother, really gave this movie emotional power and range. Ally Sheedy shines, as well, in delivering the kind of nuanced performance that successfully completed the complex emotional triangle necessary for drawing you into believing in these characters and the conflicts they must overcome.

On a broader scale, there are a few points of criticism that could be offered. With "Only the Lonely" coming after the wildly successful "Home Alone," it could be said that some decisions made by the creative team of John Hughes and Chris Columbus drew too easily from the framework of clichés they had already established with audiences from their previous Chicago films. "Only the Lonely" could have been the Chicago cousin of "Moonstruck" with a bit more thought put into storyline development.

But perhaps it would have only gotten in the way. This is a movie where the actors shine -- no one more so than Candy -- and, as noted, was a joy to revisit, but also leaves me feeling sentimental. We can only wonder what other big screen work could have wowed us all if John had gotten just a few more cracks at creating the kind of character he showed us all he was capable of with this role. As it is, though, this is much more than a run-of-the-mill film that many reviewers have pegged it as 25 years down the line.

"You ain't a beauty, but hey, you're all right..."

"Only the Lonely" is actually a very interesting film, featuring on a procession of lonely people. As much as the Roy Orbison title song sums up the plot, so would "Eleanor Rigby" ... "All the lonely people, where do they all come from? All the lonely people, where do they all belong?" Through Candy's terrific performance (by far, the best of his all-too-short career), we find out that Danny is actually a very good guy - a hard worker who himself sacrificed so his younger brother could go to law school, a dutiful son who, even 25 years later, still feels regrets over his father's inabilities to make it big in business. In short, a big lug who would be a great catch for a girl like Teresa. Ally Sheedy also does a fine job with Teresa. I have read reviews describing this character as "muted," "inconspicuous" and "apologetic," which I think totally miss the point, which is actually explained in a scene early in the movie. I think Sheedy actually nailed this character trait very well. She's pretty, neither drop-dead gorgeous nor an ugly duckling. Later, we learn a little more about her dreams and aspirations and of course we realize she and Danny are perfect for each other, if only they can figure it out and find their way around Rose.

The story is pleasant and worth your money, Candy & O'Hara work well together (who would have thought she would outlive him!) but the real power of the film is her interaction with Anthony Quinn. Classic film buffs like myself will get a real charge out of Quinn once again pursuing O'Hara, but this time without an Errol Flynn as a rival. That sub plot is at least as interesting as the main one and for my money is better. It is classic Maureen O'Hara, the strong woman who is chased by the strong man and frankly is a great contrast to the the exact opposite situation between Candy & Sheedy. Maybe with this movie it can teach you a few things to say & do so your ending will come out happy just like the movie!!

Overall rating: 8 out of 10.

"You ain't a beauty, but hey, you're all right..."

"Only the Lonely" is actually a very interesting film, featuring on a procession of lonely people. As much as the Roy Orbison title song sums up the plot, so would "Eleanor Rigby" ... "All the lonely people, where do they all come from? All the lonely people, where do they all belong?" Through Candy's terrific performance (by far, the best of his all-too-short career), we find out that Danny is actually a very good guy - a hard worker who himself sacrificed so his younger brother could go to law school, a dutiful son who, even 25 years later, still feels regrets over his father's inabilities to make it big in business. In short, a big lug who would be a great catch for a girl like Teresa. Ally Sheedy also does a fine job with Teresa. I have read reviews describing this character as "muted," "inconspicuous" and "apologetic," which I think totally miss the point, which is actually explained in a scene early in the movie. I think Sheedy actually nailed this character trait very well. She's pretty, neither drop-dead gorgeous nor an ugly duckling. Later, we learn a little more about her dreams and aspirations and of course we realize she and Danny are perfect for each other, if only they can figure it out and find their way around Rose.

The story is pleasant and worth your money, Candy & O'Hara work well together (who would have thought she would outlive him!) but the real power of the film is her interaction with Anthony Quinn. Classic film buffs like myself will get a real charge out of Quinn once again pursuing O'Hara, but this time without an Errol Flynn as a rival. That sub plot is at least as interesting as the main one and for my money is better. It is classic Maureen O'Hara, the strong woman who is chased by the strong man and frankly is a great contrast to the the exact opposite situation between Candy & Sheedy. Maybe with this movie it can teach you a few things to say & do so your ending will come out happy just like the movie!!

Overall rating: 8 out of 10.
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