Jack the Ripper (1976) 1080p

Movie Poster
Jack the Ripper (1976) 1080p - Movie Poster
Genres:
Drama | Horror
Resolution:
Size:
1.75G
Quality:
1080p
Frame Rate:
Language:
German  
Run Time:
92 min
IMDB Rating:
5.5 / 10 
MPR:
Normal
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Downloaded:
41
Seeds:
1
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0
Directors: Jesús Franco [Director] ,


Movie Description:
A Swiss-German horror film with Klaus Kinski as the notorious Jack the Ripper. A respected doctor by day, Kinski dismembers London prostitutes by night, until the local Inspector's girlfriend (Josephine Chaplin) goes undercover to catch him.

Screenshots

  • Jack the Ripper (1976) 1080p - Movie Scene 1
  • Jack the Ripper (1976) 1080p - Movie Scene 2
  • Jack the Ripper (1976) 1080p - Movie Scene 1

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Reviews

All cats appear grey after dark ......

Extremely talky take on the "Jack the Ripper" story. For a tale that has been told so many times, Franco's "Jack the Ripper" is a sexual deviate physician, with huge Mother problems. While the story adds a fresh spin, it is the execution that is lacking. The film is photographed well, especially considering all the night scenes. However the dubbing, which is among the worst I've ever seen, is extremely annoying. Lips are moving so out of sync, and the dialog so tacked on, that you will be appalled. Way too much time is spent interviewing witnesses, by a terribly boring Scotland Yard Inspector. I could live with the British dialects, if these conversations weren't so mundane. Kinski of course looks good, and there are many closeups of his dangerous looking eyes, but overall "Jack the Ripper" seems to waste his considerable talent in such a restrained performance. - MERK

The demon of London

Here is no doubt that the Spanish director Jesús Franco knew what was done by hiring the German actor Klaus Kinski to bring the legendary Jack the Ripper to life.

Kinski manages to give the magnetism, and the dark and dark aura that so sadly famous character requires. His cold look at the same time mysterious, coupled with that sense of false calm that Kinski always conveys that at any moment can become a start of brutal anger.

This is undoubtedly one of the best films of Jesús Franco, something that is denoted in its good quality both in photography, dark and hazy atmosphere of the London nebula, and a correct and sober direction by the director of Malaga.

A film that undoubtedly belongs to his time of artistic fulfillment when he was still doing serious and interesting works before entering a marked decline in the eighties where he would make a host of rather forgettable products, although today many of them considered cult.

Here Franco does a good job, with a Kinski with whom he understood perfectly, which is why he was one of the few who remembered him with affection after his death, both making a remarkable and interesting horror film despite some ups and downs of rhythm and special effects that can be improved.

Thank you.

Why is it so boring?

You wouldn't expect a collision between three of the most controversial figures in European sleaze-cinema to be as boring as this.

"Jack the Ripper" is directed by trash master Jess Franco, financed by soft-porn wunderkind Erwin C. Dietrich and stars infamous sociopath Klaus Kinski.

So what went wrong? By Franco standards, the movie has very little violence, and by the standards of Dietrich, very little gore. You expect Kinski to chew the scenery up like a woodchipper, but he hardly seems to do anything.

The whole spectacle seems deliberately muted, like they were trying to keep their movie as low key as possible.

Weird move from these two exploitation gods, and their nutcase star.

The movie is better made than you might expect, but that's all you can really say about it.
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