Spellbound (1945) 1080p

Movie Poster
Spellbound (1945) 1080p - Movie Poster
Genres:
Film-Noir | Mystery
Resolution:
Size:
2.25G
Quality:
1080p
Frame Rate:
Language:
English  
Run Time:
111 min
IMDB Rating:
7.6 / 10 
MPR:
Normal
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Downloaded:
19
Seeds:
0
Peers:
2
Directors: Alfred Hitchcock [Director] ,


Movie Description:
Dr. Constance Petersen (Ingrid Bergman) is a psychiatrist at Green Manors mental asylum. The head of Green Manors has just been replaced, with his replacement being the renowned Dr. Anthony Edwardes (Gregory Peck). Romance blossoms between Dr. Petersen and Dr. Edwards but Dr. Edwards starts to show odd aversions and personality traits. It is discovered that he is an impostor, and amnesiac, and may have killed the real Dr. Edwardes. Dr. Petersen is determined to discover the truth through unlocking the secrets held in the impostor's mind, a process which potentially puts her and others' lives at risk.

Screenshots

  • Spellbound (1945) 1080p - Movie Scene 1
  • Spellbound (1945) 1080p - Movie Scene 2
  • Spellbound (1945) 1080p - Movie Scene 1

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Reviews

Rather ironic that a film titled "Spellbound" doesn't keep me spellbound, isn't it?

I honestly expected to be a little spellbound by Alfred Hitchcock's 1945 mystery "Spellbound" given that they are some talented talents behind it. I mean this film's got stars Ingrid Bergman and Gregory Peck, and director Alfred Hitchcock behind it. Given that I have reasonably high expectations based on their work, I wanted to get into this film for the sake of those people involved. Unfortunately, such talented people as these can't save a disappointingly dull film such as "Spellbound".

In the film, we follow a psychiatrist (Ingrid Bergman) at a mental hospital who is considered by her fellow doctors as one of the best. She and her fellow peers welcome the new director (Gregory Peck) of the hospital, but fairly soon, she begins to notice some peculiar aspects about him. She notices that he has a unusual fear of seeing dark parallel lines and a white background together. In addition, she eventually finds out that he isn't who he claims to be and that he has a serious case of amnesia. When she also learns that he accidentally committed a murder, she tries to cure him of his mental struggles by learning more about his past.

I should mention the few aspects of this picture that I found were decent. One thing is that there are a few eye-catching shots that I thought were well executed. There's a shot in which is similar to the type of camera shots you see in today's first person shooter video games, where someone is pointing a gun at one of the main leads and we see through their point of view. I thought that shot and similar shots like that were worthy of praising. I also don't find the performances from the leads that bad and I thought they were doing whatever they could to keep the film moving.

So what did I think made "Spellbound" as disappointing as I'm claiming it to be? Well, my problem with "Spellbound" can be summarized as such: it's boring beyond belief. Why do I find it boring? I thought the direction seemed to indicate that everything that was happening in the plot was not the slightest bit interesting. The screenplay by Ben Hecht didn't give its characters anything fascinating to talk about and hardly did anything to get us invested in following the plot. This film is basically trying to force us to avoid emotionally attaching to it as much as possible. What's worse is that it succeeds well at doing just that. About 10 to 20 minutes into watching this film, that's the point where I completely lost interest in following the narrative since it is told in such a lifeless manner between the boring conversations the characters have and the boring things that are being captured on film.

I believe this is definitely one of Alfred Hitchcock's weakest films because of its lack of emotional involvement, because of its uninspiring direction, because of its lame script, and because of the fact that the story that was being told wasn't that good to begin with. Maybe I didn't pick up on something in the main plot, maybe I followed it just fine enough, either way I expected much more from the talents involved that what I got. Unless you're a hardcore Hitchcock fan and just want to look at it for the sake of seeing all his flicks, I'd definitely say there are much better Hitchcock films to check out.

Pretty dull Hitchcock outing

Not one of my favourite Hitchcocks. This psychological drama draws on familiar territory for the director: it's about a supposedly wronged man, on the run for murder, the victim of a conspiracy that he must unravel before the police close the net. The twist is that the mystery lies inside his amnesic mind, and his new love interest must attempt to solve the clues and puzzle out the truth before it's too late.

My main problem with this film is the story, or lack thereof. It's just too slender to sustain a feature-length production, and the denouement, when it comes, is largely routine (save for a shocking childhood flashback) and could have been explained a lot earlier. There are extraneous characters galore and long, drawn-out sequences where nothing much happens. I found Hitchcock's trademark tension to be thin on the ground, and I was expecting a lot more from the man who made the likes of FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT and NORTH BY NORTHWEST.

On the plus side, the film boasts a central pair of good performances from both Gregory Peck and Ingrid Bergman, and a fine supporting turn for THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E.'s Leo G. Carroll. It's just a shame their talents couldn't have been put to use in a better production.

The Dream Sequence Makes This Movie Worthy

In Green Manors mental institution, Dr. Constance Petersen (Ingrid Bergman) is initiating her career of psychoanalyst and is considered a cold woman that has no time for love by her colleagues. When the head of the hospital Dr. Murchison (Leo G. Carroll) is forced to retire by the board after a breakdown, his replacement is the successful Dr. Anthony Edwardes (Gregory Peck) that is so young that surprises the other doctors in his arrival. Constance and Edwardes immediately fall in love for each other, but in a couple of days later it is disclosed that the man that supposes to be Dr. Edwardes in indeed an impostor that seems to be a paranoid amnesiac with guilty complex that might have killed the famous psychoanalyst. He goes away from Green Manors to the Empire State Hotel in New York and leaves a message to Dr. Constance that decides to find him. She sneaks and travels to New York, where she meets him lodged with the identity of John Brown. Dr. Constance decides to heal him recovering his memory and discover the fate of the true Dr. Anthony Edwardes.

"Spellbound" is far from being among my favorite Hitchcock's movies, but there is at least one unforgettable moment in this suspenseful but dull romance: the sequence of John Ballantine's dream based on designs of Salvador Dali. Ingrid Bergman performs a psychoanalyst vulnerable in many moments and with unacceptable attitudes, like for example, prioritizing to open her correspondence that giving attention to her mentally ill patient Mr. Garmes or her juvenile rapture with Gregory Peck's character. My vote is seven.

Title (Brazil): "Spellbound – Quando Fala o Cora??o" ("Spellbound – When the Heart Speaks")
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