The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (2014) 3D

Movie Poster
The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (2014) 3D - Movie Poster
Genres:
Action | Adventure
Resolution:
1920*1080
Size:
2.06G
Quality:
3D
Frame Rate:
23.976 fps
Language:
English 2.0  
Run Time:
141 min
IMDB Rating:
7.3 / 10 
MPR:
PG-13
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Downloaded:
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Directors: Marc Webb [Director] ,


Movie Description:
We've always known that Spider-Man's most important conflict has been within himself: the struggle between the ordinary obligations of Peter Parker and the extraordinary responsibilities of Spider-Man. But in The Amazing Spider-Man 2, Peter Parker finds that his greatest battle is about to begin. It's great to be Spider-Man (Andrew Garfield). For Peter Parker, there's no feeling quite like swinging between skyscrapers, embracing being the hero, and spending time with Gwen (Emma Stone). But being Spider-Man comes at a price: only Spider-Man can protect his fellow New Yorkers from the formidable villains that threaten the city. With the emergence of Electro (Jamie Foxx), Peter must confront a foe far more powerful than he. And as his old friend, Harry Osborn (Dane DeHaan), returns, Peter comes to realize that all of his enemies have one thing in common: Oscorp. Directed by Marc Webb. Produced by Avi Arad and Matt Tolmach. Screenplay by Alex Kurtzman & Roberto Orci & Jeff Pinkner. Screen Story by Alex Kurtzman & Roberto Orci & Jeff Pinkner and James Vanderbilt. Based on the Marvel comic book by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko.

Screenshots

  • The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (2014) 3D - Movie Scene 1
  • The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (2014) 3D - Movie Scene 2
  • The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (2014) 3D - Movie Scene 1

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Reviews

A Testament to Poor Filmmaking

I am utterly appalled by how horrendous this movie is. I honestly cannot wrap my mind around how this thing got made (or at least got released in this condition). The movie starts with a plot line that you couldn't care less about. Remember Peter's parents from the first movie? No, well that's because no one cared about them. Thankfully we get to see even more of their completely intriguing back story here... just kidding. It sucks a lot. The opening scenes involving them are plagued with horrible acting, choppy editing, poor directing, and bad, cliched dialog. In fact, this trend continues through a lot of the movie. Scenes involving Paul Giamatti and his horrible Russian accent are laughable. He seems to have just stepped out of a cartoon. I know this is a comic book movie, but even in the fun world they are trying to create this just doesn't fit. I see what they wanted to do but this scene is just so poorly done. Spider-Man is just not that funny, and again it seems to be choppily edited and poorly written. Even Gwen's decent speech(which way too obviously foreshadows her death) is ruined by putting stupid action sequences over it. A similar scenario comes up with Jamie Foxx's Max Dillon. He seems to be confused about what movie he is in. Imagine if you multiplied Jim Carrey's Riddler from Batman Forever ten-fold. That is Foxx's character here. The performance and dialog is truly cringe-worthy, and he has absolutely no motivation for anything he does other than the fact that he's crazy and loves Spider-Man (that is until he forgets his name). The Osborn family is just as bad. As Norman dies, he tells his son Harry (who we are somehow supposed to give a crap about) that he has the same disease. The whole scene is pretty bad and although they try to explain away why they spend their last moments together fighting and why they make a teenager the head of a company, that doesn't make it better. By the time Harry and Electro decide to work together (shocker?), the movie really just becomes so horribly awful it is beyond repair. Almost every scene becomes just so laughable and the ones that aren't have a completely different tone. It's like five different people directed the movie. It has no idea if it wants to be serious or not. Then, with only thirty minutes left of the movie, we get this whole scene that seems to only exist to set up a Sinister Six spin-off and make Harry the Green Goblin just so he can kill Gwen and leave room for a new leading actress in a sequel. Electro and Green Goblin are then both easily defeated (and put to the side immediately afterward), and although they try to show that Peter doesn't want to fight Harry it doesn't really work because we only just became aware of their relationship. There are a couple funny lines here and there, but everything is just so uninteresting. Harry's search for a cure is boring because he is essentially a stranger and no one even seems interested in it (especially Dane DeHaan), everything involving Electro is frustrating to watch, all of Aunt May's scenes are poor because Sally Field seems to just be phoning it in, and even Peter and Gwen's relationship begins to become boring and repetitive. Everything in the movie exists only to move the plot along. And at times it seems it's not even trying to move this movie's plot forward but instead step up sequels and spin-offs. Everything in the movie's plot is connected but not because it's a smart film, but because it is relying on coincidence. I honestly can't explain how bad many of these scenes are. Throughout it, you keep asking... Was that really the best take? Were those really the best lines you could have possibly written? Was any of this even scripted? Like did you intend to make a film or did it just kind of happen accidentally and you figured "hey just stitch all this random crap together and add in some CGI...It will be fine"? Well, sorry to tell you Sony but it wasn't. Despite all this, there are some good things. Andrew Garfield is still a pretty good Spider-Man (and an alright Peter Parker), Emma Stone is great as always, and their relationship is the best part of the movie (likely due to their real-life relationship and Marc Webb's directing as he's experienced with such scenes). The action is also fairly well directed, but good action sequences don't just make a great movie (especially when you add random "tension" to them). And although I may seem heartless, I must admit that the scene involving Gwen's death is actually saddening. It may be rushed but the acting and directing here is actually really well done. In fact the few scenes following it are the best in movie. There are some great shots of Peter standing beside Gwen's grave for months on end. It's like it's the only part of the movie that anyone working on it actually gave a crap about (unfortunately that too is ruined with Spider-Man coming back at the end instead of it being left more ambiguous). In short, this movie is a disaster. It suffers from a horrible screenplay, cheesy dialog, poor editing, and directing and acting that is good in one moment and horrible the next. It exists solely to move the dying franchise forward and to make more money. It is a heartless piece of media and, in my subjective opinion, is very poorly made. It is without a doubt the worst movie I've seen this year and definitely the worst Spider-Man movie.

A Hero without Principles

The Amazing Spider-Man 2 has technical merits. However, these merits are impossible to enjoy in a film drowned from beginning to end in the sickening narcissism of both its purported hero and supposedly tragic villains. I give you The Amazing Spider-Man: a hero with no principles and no goals. He sometimes cares about a girl and sometimes wants to know what happened to his parents, but day-to-day he really only cares about doing what he wants to do--which happens to be helping people, it seems, because it gives them "hope." And what luck! He gives them this just by being himself. Not by being a better person. Not by sacrificing anything else in his life for the greater good. Just by being strong and smart and doing exactly what he feels like doing because that's how he feels. And look: by being himself, other people want to be like him. What a wonderful message for a self-obsessed age. And watching the box office dollars roll in, it would seem that this is just what everyone wants to hear. Ah, but lovable doe-eyed Petey gives up Gwen for the greater good, right? No he doesn't. He gives her up because he can't face the guilt of having contributed to her father's death--his guilt, and his unquestioned inability to give up being a famous public figure, lead to his need to break up (And his principled stand on this issue is so strong that he will renege on it whenever he feels randy). We never see Peter torn between helping people and helping himself. We see him torn between two paths to self-gratification: the adulation of public heroism (and public vilification, which is a kind of adulation) and the love of a single woman. What about Aunt May? No, not her--she's just in the way of Spidey laundry. This is the major problem with the reboot: The overshadowing death isn't Uncle Ben's. It's Captain Stacy's. And Captain Stacy didn't die because Peter was self-absorbed. Captain Stacy died because Peter existed. So the standard for Peter being a good person or bad person has nothing to do with his character--it has only to do with his presence. During an over-the-top car chase in the first act, rather than stop a massive truck from smashing through a set of cars (which Sam Raimi has shown us he could have done, assuming equivalence between a truck and a train), Spidey ducks out of the way only to come back after the carnage. This is a hero who says, "I'm here for you--until it's inconvenient for me, then you're on your own." The long and short of it is that this Spider-Man is in no way heroic. Superheroes are heroic because, while they could decide that they are unconcerned with our struggles, they still feel a moral obligation to help the average Joe. This Spider-Man seems to feel obliged to help only because, as someone superior to everyone else, the world's problems must naturally fall on his shoulders. Not because someone died due to his inaction--because he's exceptional. And helping inferior people is what exceptional people do. Sometimes. When they're not busy dealing with exceptional-person stuff. Like obsessing about parents who unjustly abandoned them while feeling no responsibility whatsoever for the uncle they themselves abandoned. Add to this a pair of villains who go from being apparently well-meaning if somewhat imbalanced individuals to homicidal maniacs due to a single rejection episode, and you have a two-hour cesspool of poorly justified destructive self-obsession. Electro could have been a tragic Frankenstein villain. Instead, because a group of random people roots for Spider-Man over him in his first public appearance, he decides everyone should die. Yup--that's his motivation. You don't love me because I'm me? Well, I'll kill you all. Thank you, Columbine. Harry's the same. After a five-minute meeting in which Spider-Man refuses give him his blood--which he truly believes, based on a single night's research on a single computer file, is the only thing that can save him from a horrible death that won't happen for another 40 years--Harry decides that Spider-Man needs to die right now. And everyone who dies in the process of saving his own old-age skin is perfectly okay. This despite Harry having been Peter's best friend only 48 hours before--though not because they have a long history together, but because they talked for a few hours and remembered how they were friends eight years ago. And it's not like either of them developed any other close relationships over their entire time in high school and college. (Let that be the only mention I will make of this film's preposterous set of causes and effects--and its Attack-of-the-Clones-inspired need to intellectually dictate emotional importance rather than meaningfully display it.) The original Spider-Man had a single moment of narcissism. Count 'em: one. Only once did Peter Parker step up for glory, himself, and his own objectives, and he immediately paid for it with the death of one of the only three people he loved. This new Peter Parker steps up for himself every day as a part of his playground vision of a hero, and not a single screenwriter or billion-dollar audience member seems to care. This Spider-Man says the world should glorify you for being you, and if that doesn't happen, it's the world that needs to change, not you. And that is what truly terrifies me.

Spends most of its time setting up future movies ...

"The Amazing Spider-man 2" is a tough one. A Movie I can't actually figure out whether I liked or not. Parts of it were actually amazing. While other parts were far from it. I Think the main problem with this second Spider-man movie (Or is it fifth Spider-man movie?) is that the film before it still feels like a re-run. Yes, as good as "The Amazing Spider-man" was. It still felt over-shadowed by three previous movies that didn't really deserve to get ignored. I left that one thinking "Oh well, at least they've got the setting up out of the way, and can get on with doing something different in the next one." Trouble is, they haven't. This one also spends most of its time setting up future movies. While other parts bring nothing new and feel like more repeats. I mean, wasn't that "Washing machine" gag done in the other "Spider-man 2?" The biggest mistake "The Amazing Spider-man 2" makes though. Is one that this series should already have learnt not to do. And that's under-using its villain. The main bad guy off this one is suppose to be Electro. A Bad-guy that was always going to be a tough sell, and they don't quite manage it. In the Cartoons he looks so ridiculous that they've had to entirely redesign him, which is cool. But the character is ruined after an amazing intro by being under-used yet over done. The "Real" main villain of the movie is Harry Osborne (Dane DeHann) and although this is one of the things that has been done before, he is arguably the best thing in the movie. The minute DeHann was cast I knew he would be great, and he is. His "dual identity" too, has been redesigned, but for the better. With a new take, that makes the future of the series at least look promising. But what about this movie? It likes building up future ideas, but there must be something else good about it by itself? Well, Andrew Garfield is still pleasing fans as Spider-man, and his chemistry with Emma Stone is still strong. Providing the movie with most of its laughs, charm, and in some parts, genuine tears. But we watch Spider-man for the action, right? And most of the action too, is still cool. Even if the series has far from reinvented itself, and is still spending a bit too much time on Spider-man's love life, than his crime fighting.
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