Short Circuit (1986) 720p

Movie Poster
Short Circuit (1986) - Movie Poster
Genres:
Comedy | Family
Resolution:
1280*720
Size:
651.12M
Quality:
720p
Frame Rate:
23.976 fps
Language:
English 2.0  
Run Time:
98 min
IMDB Rating:
6.4 / 10 
MPR:
Add Date:

Downloaded:
85
Seeds:
3
Peers:
0
Directors: John Badham [Director] ,


Movie Description:
Number 5, one of a group of experimental military robots, undergoes a sudden transformation after being struck by lightning. He develops self-awareness, consciousness, and a fear of the reprogramming that awaits him back at the factory. With the help of a young woman, Number 5 tries to evade capture and convince his creator that he has truly become alive.

Screenshots

  • Short Circuit (1986) - Movie Scene 1
  • Short Circuit (1986) - Movie Scene 2
  • Short Circuit (1986) - Movie Scene 1

Related Movies:

  • Once Upon a Prince (2018)

    Read More »

    Susanna (Megan Park) gladly accepts help one day from handsome stranger Nate (Jonathan Keltz) at her parents' garden store in small-town Georgia. Sparks between them fly, but when a photo of them gets leaked to the press, Susanna is in for the shock of her life, when Nate is called back home by his mother...for his coronation as King Nathaniel of Cambria.

  • The Next Best Thing (2000)

    Read More »

    A comedy-drama about best friends - one a straight woman, Abbie, the other a gay man, Robert - who decide to have a child together. Five years later, Abbie falls in love with a straight man and wants to move away with her and Robert's little boy Sam, and a nasty custody battle ensues.

  • La riffa (1991)

    Read More »

    Francesca, an incredibly beautiful woman, lost her husband. Only after his death she discovers his unfaithfulness and overall the huge amount of debts he left. Cesare is Francesca's best friend, he is a solicitor. Following his advices Francesca starts selling all her goods, like the house, jewels, furs and finally also the yacht. By doing this she is able to survive for the rest of the year, but has no perspective for the future. In fact she is unemployed and every plan to get a job fails. She finally takes a decision: she set up a lottery in which the prize is she. Twenty of the most influent man of the high society Bari (Italy), former Francesca's husband friends, accepts the rules and buy the tickets. The same day Francesca fall in love for Antonio and manage the situation becomes harder. A judge is investigating on the illegal lottery; a scandal is going to explode. Francesca has to find a way out of the strange but danger situation.

Reviews

Underrated

I'm sorry, I can't see why this film has been given such a low rating. This film is wonderfully life-affirming through the character of robot Jonny 5 (the scene where he realises what it means to be alive through crushing a grass hopper is beautifully portrayed), Ally Sheedy brings a bucket load of positive energy to the character of the naive but loving Stephanie, and to top it all there is a subtle but powerful comment on American militarism. There is a real emphasis on quality screen writing here which only comes through on a small ratio of films. The characters could easily have become 2 dimensional stereotypes, but instead given some interesting dialogue and motives (science, military etc). Yes it is cheesy, and I think many people label it as a cheap and tacky 80's movie, but having watched it again recently I think history may well judge it a minor classic.

I still love this one today

I practically grew up watching this one. And this film is two years older than I am. Number Five has long been a movie personality I grew to adore, as well as his human co-actors. There has never been a time where I have watched and not smiled at it's quirky verbal humor. I have recommended it to many acquaintances looking for a good, old 80's comedy. The sequel is not quite as up there, but I also keep it mixed in with my favorite DVDs. For any science fiction fan, it can be seen as a classic and prelude to movies such as "I, Robot". 10 out of 10 is my rating because this movie has played a great part in my movie-watching life. I first saw it at the age of 9 (edited Disney broadcast version, with the adult language cut out) and have looked to it ever since if I just want to get a little laugh. And, for me, a little laugh in my otherwise stressful life is a great thing. 10/10

A rarity among family-oriented films...

There have been many films that claim they can entertain audiences of all ages. Indeed, this seems to be the most profitable kind of film to make, with the family-oriented often translating to the lowest common denominator. There is a rare kind of film in this oversaturated market, however. Namely, the film that claims it can entertain an audience in almost any age bracket, and really can deliver on this promise. I know how this sounds, so bear with me a moment. Short Circuit is, at heart, a comedy about what happens when a robot designed to replace a special forces soldier is struck by lightning, and starts to believe he is a living entity. Much of the rest of the film revolves around either Number 5's attempts to evade capture by the people who made him, or his attempts to convince the people he meets of the truly wonderful thing that has happened to him. Ally Sheedy and Steve Guttenberg provide an excellent support cast that does a first rate job of interacting with the character. This was one of the first films to show human actors engaging in conversation with what was essentially a full-scale puppet, and it remains one of the best. With brilliant voice acting by Tim Blaney, Number 5 seems more human than some of the other actors in the film, especially G.W. Bailey. They must have had a special on Police Academy alumni that year. Speaking of Police Academy, the "let's rip the front seats out and sit in the back" joke gets a couple of references here. In fact, a few old classics get a good reference in this effort. Interestingly enough, the Three Stooges short that is shown and imitated in a couple of sequences is called Woman Haters. Go figure. The one weakness of the film is that it seems primarily constructed around a few puppeteering or special effects sequences. The use of the laser beams here seems very dated by modern standards, and the computers would look unbelievable if I hadn't personally seen the computers that were available to the public and business around this year. Sadly, they do not make films like this anymore. In this day and age, where every film has to be made as expensively as possible, and even films aimed at children seem segmented, nobody seems willing to consider that the adults in the audience might need to be entertained, too. Which is a real pity. Films like Short Circuit have the ability to appeal to this viewer even more now that he is twenty-something years old than was the case when he was eight years old. I doubt that anyone who turns twenty-six in 2020 is going to same the same about the Pokemon or other such mind-numbing single-digit-age-only crap that is being churned out. I gave Short Circuit an eight out of ten. It is starting to show its age, but as a relic of the mid-1980s, it also shows that there were people asking questions about the advancement of technology. Indeed, on the basis of films like Short Circuit, I am almost willing to regard the 1980s as the last bastion of creativity in the mainstream film industry. Give it a look expecting a film about more than money, and you may be pleasantly surprised.
Read More Reviews